Groups: City of London Walking Tours

For details of these group walking tours and to book please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

With the exception of “Spitalfields in 50 minutes” and Broadgate Art in 60 minutes” all tours last 90 minutes and cost £10 and are conducted by qualified guides. A minimum of ten people is required to book one of these group walks.

Please let us know if you would like details of restaurants or pubs where your group can enjoy lunch/dinner. We have received good feedback from Poppies Fish Restaurant, the Water Poet, the Counting House, Middle Temple Hall, Centre Page, Ironmonger’s Hall, Chez Elles and many curry houses in Brick Lane.

Walks are in aid of the Huguenots of Spitalfields educational project.

Cheques to be made payable to Huguenots of Spitalfields (charity number 1151801).

Spitalfields1. Spitalfields in 50 minutes

Tailor-made for lunchtime or after work entertainment join our guide for a 50-minute walk of Spitalfields taking in the historic, trendy and unusual parts of this vibrant area of London.  Meet characters; hear their stories and achievements.  You will be amazed at what you will hear about Spitalfields. 

2. Silk, Satin, Muslin, Rags - The Story of the Spitalfields Weavers (90 minute tour)

Whether you are interested in Georgian architecture, the Huguenot story, Spitalfields silk, or the many weavers who lived and worked in these streets you will be fascinated to join this tour. Hear about the Huguenots who were baptized, married and were buried at Christ Church, the rich silk merchants who lived in elegant houses and the life of the journeymen who spent every working hour weaving Spitalfields silk now to be found in museums around the world.

3. Bishopsgate Art in 60 minutes

Hidden behind Liverpool Street station is one of the greatest collections of public art works ever assembled in this country. Amid the squares, terraces, colonnades and piazzas you will find statues, water features, paintings and murals.

 

Other 90 Minute Walking Tours

 

4. Heart of the City

This tour includes some of the finest buildings in the City.  We will tell you everything you need to know about the Bank of England, The Royal Exchange, Mansion House, Guildhall, St Paul’s Cathedral, Cheapside, Livery Companies and the River Thames.

5. New Architecture

The skyline of the City of London is always striking but nothing can compare to being up close to some of the most extraordinary new architecture currently under construction. Hear about the Cheesegrater, the Walkie Talkie, the Stump and many other buildings that we pass.  

Inns of Court

6. Inns of Court

London’s Inns of Court are oases of calm amid the rush and bustle of the City’s legal heartland and this 90-minute tour walking through the gardens of the four Inns of Court is a delightful way to hear about the legal profession, famous characters and see imposing buildings and some surprisingly large green spaces.

7. Roman Wall

The City of London is rich in Roman history.  Join us for a walk around part of the wall, see the traces and hear the legacy of Roman residents who lived and worked in London for around 400 years.

8.Huguenots in London

Over 50,000 Huguenots (French Protestants) fled religious persecution in France and sought sanctuary in London. The hat-makers settled in Wandsworth, the clockmakers and jewellers in Clerkenwell, the weavers in Spitalfields, the elite in Greenwich and those working in the luxury goods trades in Soho . For details of these five walks and meeting places contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

9. Christ Church Spitalfields

Visit Nicholas Hawksmoor’s masterpiece and the finest baroque church in the country.  How it was built, fell into disrepair, renovated will be revealed. Hear about the Huguenot organist Peter Prelleur and the many Huguenots who were baptised, married and buried here.  A walk around this vibrant and colourful area can be arranged either prior or post visit to Christ Church.

st pauls

10. Wren Churches

Hear about the sheer genius of Sir Christopher Wren and see some of his remarkable churches built in the City after the Great Fire of 1666. Each one different in size, shape and features - they are a glorious legacy of a brilliant man.

11. St Paul's Cathedral

Recognised to be Sir Christopher Wren's masterpiece and one of the most iconic buildings in the world, a visit to St Paul's Cathedral and discover howWren’s tenacity, talent, creativity and financial support ensured the building was completed.

12. The Guildhall Yard Complex

Tucked away behind Gresham Street is one of the most significant City of Londonlocations.The Guildhall, older than Parliament itself; the Guildhall Art Gallery with its superb, unrivalledcollection of paintings and the lost remains of theRoman amphitheatre recalling London’s Roman roots.  Prepare to be captivated by this complex!

13. Along the Thames

A 90-minute stroll along the Thames embankment, walking east, we visit the Monument, St Magnus the Martyr, London Bridge, Billingsgate, Livery Companies, HMS Belfast, hidden gardens and narrowalleyways, Tower Bridge and much more.

14. Fleet Street

Once referred to as the ‘street of ink’ a walk down Fleet Street will reveal far more than ink. Dr Johnson’s House, Edgar Wallace, Fleet Prison, Whitefriars, the Carmelites, Punch Tavern, the story of the newspapers once produced and printed here ending up at the Royal Courts of Justice.

15. Alternative Spitalfields

Known to some as the home of the Huguenots, Jews and Bangladeshis and to others as one of the hippest, lively and diverse areas in London. See the graffiti art, street art, old and new architecture as well as churches, pubs, synagogues and other sites. Hear about the rich and the poor have lived and worked in this historic area for generations and how the refugees played their part in making Spitalfields one of the most captivating areas in London.

16. The Financial City

Hear how the Bank of England as well as the major trading Exchanges: the Royal, the Metal and the Baltic Exchange, started and their dominant role in the City; walk through alleyways recalling the early coffee houses, and other City institutions which made London a world-class trading centre.

17. Smithfield

Although there are no traces now this area has associations with a bloody past.  Once the abattoir of London, the place where the martyrs were burned, the site where great jousting tournaments took place, now Smithfield houses one of the most advanced meat markets in Europe.  This tour will include Postman’s Park, St Bartholomew the Great and the Less and the gem of the museum at St Bartholomew’s Hospital.

18. St Helen’s Bishopsgate

Just the sight of this once Benedictine priory built in the 12th century St Helen’s is one of the few churches to have survived the Great Fire of London and the Blitz and is the only building from a nunnery to survive in the City. It has some outstanding memorials dating back to the 15th century and houses the tomb of Sir Thomas Gresham. Now, one of London’s thriving evangelical churches St Helen’s has a global reputation for their teaching. Well worth a visit.

19. Greenwich

Greenwich was where the wealthy Huguenots moved to after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes and around the influential Marquis de Ruvigny. They were a small, but significant group. Many lived in Crooms Hill and worshipped at St Alfege Church - a few tombstones still remain. Hear about their houses, exploits (some not legal) and the characters that once lived in this heritage town, full of history.

20. Clerkenwell

Although not as well-known as the Spitalfields and Soho settlements, Clerkenwell was another of the London areas where Huguenots - refugees from religious persecution in France - came to live from the late 1600s onwards. Join Clerkenwell & Islington Guide, David Evans, to discover something of what they found there and what they brought to a locality that was fast becoming a London suburb on the very doorstep of the City of London.

21. Wandsworth

The Huguenots (French Protestants) settled in Wandsworth because of the purity and power of the River Wandle, which was ideal for bleaching, and dyeing of felt. The Wandle was known as the hardest working river in Europe were many copper and other mills were located. The Huguenots had superb skills and made the most beautiful hats, which were the envy of Europe. They lived in elegant houses (very few remain today) and worshipped at the Union Chapel. Many were buried between 1687 and 1854 at the Mount Nod Cemetery, which is known as the Huguenot burial ground.

22. Soho

It was to Soho where thousands of Huguenots settled to be near the Royal Court and wealthy clients. They were skilled craftsmen who left their homes, families and possessions to start a new life in England. They brought new techniques and designs and created the most sought after luxury goods that money could buy.

23. City

The contribution the Huguenots made to the commerce and banking in the City of London was enormous. It covered insurance, stockbroking, finance and commerce. You will walk through some of the alleyways of the City and hear the story of the characters who have played their part in the creation of the financial centre of this country. From the amazing dress of Spitalfields silk worn by Mrs Fanshawe at Mansion House to the location of the huguely important Threadneedle Street Church you will be fascinated to hear more about Huguenots in the life of the City of London.

For details of these walking tours and to book please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Notes

With the exception of “Spitalfields in 50 minutes” and Broadgate Art in 60 minutes” all tours last 90 minutes and cost £10 and are conducted by qualified guides.

Please let us know if you would like details of restaurants or pubs where your group can enjoy lunch/dinner. We have received good feedback from Poppies Fish Restaurant, the Water Poet, the Counting House, Middle Temple Hall, Centre Page, Ironmonger’s Hall, Chez Elles and many curry houses in Brick Lane.

Walks are in aid of the Huguenots of Spitalfields educational project.

Cheques to be made payable to Huguenots of Spitalfields (charity number 1151801).